What are my supervisor training responsibilities?

What Employers Need to Know

DOT Drug and Alcohol Supervisor Training

Per the Department of Transportation, employers must provide training to all persons who supervise drivers subject to the regulations, in accordance with §382.603. The purpose of this training is to enable supervisors to determine whether reasonable suspicion exists to require a driver to undergo testing described in §382.307.
It must include at least 60 minutes of training on alcohol misuse and 60 minutes on controlled substances use (120 minutes total)

This course meets the U.S. Department of Transportation requirements, as described in 49 CFR 382 and 40. A certified Alcohol and Drug Testing Service instructor will provide your supervisors with a professional and entertaining class that promotes questions and answer they cannot get from watching an on line video.

The Department of Transportation requires any supervisor who manages or refers employees for drug and/or alcohol testing under a DOT certified drug testing program becomes trained in the administration and implementation of these procedures. These same employees are required to be part of a random testing plan that is managed by the company or a Third Party Administrator (TPA). This training program will ensure the supervisor develops and maintains a complete testing program while limiting the company’s legal and regulatory exposure affiliated with these types of activities.

Who should take this course?

At a minimum, The Department of Transportation requires the following personnel to have training under 49 CFR 382 and 40:

  • Transportation Safety Personnel (all levels from Safety Clerk to Director)
  • Transportation Dispatch personnel
  • All HR and Safety Personnel whose company is required to meet DOT drug testing standards
  • Transportation Training Instructors
  • Personnel whose responsibility includes development of drug testing programs
  • Attorney’s specializing in Transportation

SUPERVISOR TRAINING COURSE OUTLINE

  • Overview of DOT Federal Regulations
  • Alcohol & Drug Testing Procedures
  • (FAA,FMCSA, USCG, PHMSA, FRA & FTA)
  • Reasonable Suspicion Testing
  • Supervisors Responsibilities
  • Documentation/Record Keeping
  • Prohibited Behaviors
  • Course completion Certificate

What CDL Drivers Need to Know

DOT drug and alcohol tests include:

  • Pre-employment – An employer must receive a negative drug test result before permitting a CDL driver to operate a CMV. (§382.301).
  • Post-accident – Drug and alcohol tests may be required after crashes according to the following chart (§382.303):

    Type of Accident Involved Citation Issued to the CMV Driver Test Must Be Performed by Employer
    Human Fatality Yes Yes
    Human Fatality No Yes
    Bodily Injury With Immediate Medical Treatment Away From the Scene Yes Yes
    Bodily Injury With Immediate Medical Treatment Away From the Scene No No
    Disabling Damage to Any Motor Vehicle Requiring Tow Away Yes Yes
    Disabling Damage to Any Motor Vehicle Requiring Tow Away No No
  • Random – CDL drivers must be randomly tested throughout the year (§382.305); an employer who employs only himself/herself as a driver, who is not leased to a motor carrier, shall implement a random testing program of two or more covered employees in the random testing selection pool as a member of a consortium (see §382.305 interpretation 11)
  • Reasonable suspicion – Drivers who appear to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol can be immediately tested (§382.307). Employers must train CDL driver supervisors to detect the symptoms of driver impairment (§382.603).
  • Return-to-duty – Required for drivers who tested positive, refused, or otherwise violated the prohibitions of 49 CFR Part 382 Subpart B; and who have completed the return-to-duty process with a DOT-qualified substance abuse professional. This test is directly observed, and a negative result is required before resuming driving duties (§382.309 and §40.305).
  • Follow-up – Required for drivers who tested positive, refused, or otherwise violated the prohibitions of 49 CFR Part 382 Subpart B; and who have completed the return-to-duty process with a DOT-qualified substance abuse professional, and have tested negative for a return-to-duty test. This testing is prescribed by the substance abuse professional for a minimum of 6 directly observed tests in 12 months, but can be extended an additional four years (§382.311 and §40.307).